What Should A Brand Community Ultimately Become?

At its most successful, what is your brand community going to become?

Think bigger than you do today. Think about the ultimate role it’s going to play in the lives of
your members. Think about the number of people it’s going to serve. Think about the different ways it’s going to help your organization.

Don’t be afraid to be incredibly ambitious. Ambition can mean different things

It can mean doubling down on what you have, it can mean expansion, it can mean entirely rethinking what community is to your organization.

A simple way of looking at this is in this adaptation of Ansoff’s matrix below:


(click for full image)

There are four possible strategies here based on what audience you want to target and how the community helps the company you work for.

We can list these by order of ambition. They are:

  1. ENGAGE: Increase engagement from existing members.
  2. EVOLVE: Get better results from existing members.
  3. EXPAND: Expand to target new and related audiences.
  4. TRANSFORM: Develop new communities for new value.

 

1) ENGAGE: Get members more engaged.

The most common strategy is to increase engagement, it’s also the least effective.

Unless you’ve just launched or made a hideous mistake, members are usually participating as much as they’re going to. You can make plenty of tweaks, but you’re always restricted by the law of diminishing returns.

Pursue this strategy when you’re not likely to get support for anything else. Interview two dozen members, find out what brings them to the community, and then cater overwhelmingly to that desire.

If, for example, members visit to resolve problems, the community must provide every person the best possible solution in the quickest amount of time. At the tactical level that means you need to build powerful programs to encourage top experts, teach members to ask better questions, feature the best answers, and tweak the platform relentlessly to get the best results.

GiffGaff, Spotify, Apple are all fantastic examples.

The key challenge is to narrow your focus to the few things members really care about and design every activity to make your community the best place to resolve the problem or achieve their goals.

 

2) EVOLVE: Get More Value From Members

A far better (and more ambitious) option is to expand the nature of the community so it helps other departments.

A customer support community can become a community which helps companies be more successful (customer success), collects insights (ideation), or encourages members to help promote them (advocacy).

A single community can reduce support costs, improve retention, help build better products and attract new customers.

Almost every brand community strategy should at least be trying to expand the ways it helps a business.

You still have the same group of members, only now you’re asking them to make different types of contributions.

This requires you to offer members the chance to earn rewards, gain unique access to you/your company, or build their reputations. The hard part is working internally to make this possible.

The upside is you usually expand the reach of the community to your entire customer base, not just those who have problems today. You give members a reason to visit every day to see who’s new, what’s new, what can they get? What can they learn etc?

Alteryx, Autodesk, Adobe, SAP, Square, and Salesforce all serve as great examples here.

The downside is two-fold, there is less of a trigger to visit the community in the first place and it’s a lot harder for people to do these tasks than simply answer a question, proactively share their expertise rather than ask a question.

 

3) EXPAND: Reach New Audiences

There are plenty of ways to expand to new audiences.

You can expand into new languages, locations, ages, or related audiences. A community for users of your accounting product can become a community for all types of accountants around the world.

Language and geographic regions are usually easiest areas to expand to. You already have the platform and processes in place. Expanding into areas with high numbers of non-English speakers makes sense.

Tackling different audiences is harder. You have to overcome the reason they haven’t joined already. The failure rate for communities targeted at younger audiences is extremely high.

Expanding to fill the broader sector is the most ambitious. Sephora’s BeautyTalk, Lomography, FitBit, and Nike Runner’s Club are all good examples. They’re less about the product and more about the purpose of the product.

Other companies build communities for broader audiences (e.g. Element14 (for design engineers), BabyCenter (for parents), Goodreads (Amazon), AmericanExpress OpenForum (for small businesses) etc…)

You do this to extend community members beyond your current base and bring in new customers. The downside is this usually requires a unique identity beyond just the ‘brandname’ community. There is a limit to how often you can promote yourself too.

 

4) TRANSFORM: Get new value from new audiences

The most ambitious strategy is to completely transform your company or your approach to the community. This usually comes in three forms.

1) The community becomes a platform/social network for others to build and maintain their own groups/profiles. (StackExchange, BensFriends, HealthUnlocked, DeviantArt, Care2 and others fall into this category).

2) The community becomes a business and acts as a service for members to achieve their goals. Good examples might be TripAdvisor, Kaggle, RealSelf, Rover etc…these communities usually tend to be acquired or spun off into separate businesses.

3) The community runs itself/runs areas of the company. It’s hard to find good brand examples of this. (Eve Online might be a notable mention). Members collaborate together to produce the collective value of the company and divide the spoils. Ideas are sourced by members, driven by members, and implemented by members. The company acts as a support service for the community to flourish (Airbnb has flirted with this along with several Blockchain-based companies).

Most Growth Requires A Big Change

Don’t limit yourself to just trying to deepen engagement with the members you already have. This limits the growth of your community. There are far bigger wins by looking to expand to new types of communities you’re building (customer success, advocacy) or the audiences you’re targeting.

You can achieve some short-term success by focusing on engagement, but the really big wins, the kind of wins which other people take notice of, is by expanding the community to be more useful to more people.

Support and Ambition

An old rule of thumb is the more support you have, the more ambitious you can afford to be. This is half-true. Often the very act of being able to articulate a big, noble, goal is what brings others around to supporting the community idea.

People are more likely to support a community which serves a far bigger audience and drives more results. Even without the support you need, you can still set a lofty goal and work hard to earn that support. It might take years, but at least you’re working towards something that matters.

Build a Multi-Year Roadmap

If you’re worried, again plot this into a roadmap over three years. This might look like:

  • Year 0 – 1: Deepen engagement and build support.
  • Year 1 to 3: Evolve to customer success, advocacy, and ideation.
  • Year 3 to 5: Expand to Latin America and South-East Asia.
  • Year 5+: Become a platform for others.

Now you have a vision you can articulate to both your colleagues and members. Something motivating and something which merits your requests for support and resources.

There is a chronic lack of ambition today about what a community can and should become.

It’s never just a place for members to engage with one another. It’s a place to harness the amazing potential of members to the maximum possible effect. You can’t achieve that with a narrow focus on what you’re doing today.

Be ambitious, more ambitious than you’ve dared to be in the past.

The Sense of Community You Nurture Will Outlive Your Platform

Last week, I listened to two people argue about which platform they should use to build their community.

Should they use Slack or Discord?

Today, most of their audience is on Slack. Tomorrow it might be Discord…at least for a while. Within 18 to 36 months, it will be something else.

Chasing after your audience from one platform to the next is an expensive, wasteful, approach to community building. A far better approach is to invest those same resources in building a strong sense of community.

If your audience feels a strong sense of community with one another, it doesn’t matter what platform they use. That sense of community follows them wherever they go.

But building this strong sense of community requires investments in intangible areas. You can make this tangible by running the sense of community survey first and designing specific actions (see the worksheet) to improve the sense of community.

This might include:

1) Provide funding to leaders. You might copy Wikimedia and provide resources for leaders to step forward and create their own groups or run their own events. You would help train them, give them unique access, fly them in to meet your team, and promote the groups they create. If you’ve built strong relationships with leaders, it doesn’t matter if one of them moves a chunk of your audience from one platform to another.

2) Bring the community to customers. You would bring the community into the natural journey customers go through when using a product. ‘Have a question? Want to get better? Here is our community who can help…’. You would entwine the community(ies) as closely as possible with the product. Updated links to relevant discussion topics embedded within its use would help.

3) Design rituals. After a member has made a certain number of contributions, they would be invited to give their feedback, share their toughest challenge, or how they got into the topic. Something which opens members up to the group. You may consider special features for members on their anniversary of using the product.

4) Develop a unique identity. You would give community members a unique name and a place which documents the history of the community. Who were the top members, how did they get started, what were the major milestones of the group? This would be shared and communicated to all new customers.

5) Have a newspaper. Each week you would publish the community newspaper, edited by members, featuring the best contributions from the community. This might include the best advice, funniest stories, or anything else which could be interesting to the group. This would cover communities across all platforms, including those that aren’t involved with you at all. Let everyone pitch their ideas and stories to the group. This newsletter helps build and establish the social hierarchy within the group.

6) Host and promote events. Three types of events can work well. The first are events you host just for your top members. Spotify’s Rock Star Jam is a good example. This builds close relationships between anyone building any kind of community for your brand. The second are member-hosted meetups. Provide some limited funding (perhaps $100 per meetup for food/drinks) and plenty of local promotion for any member who wants to host meetups with others. The third is big conferences. If you have a big audience, it may be worth bringing them together once a year. These build strong relationships between members.

7) Gather and identify useful feedback through any channel. Scan all social and community channels run by members for any useful feedback you can send on. Answer questions in these communities and let them know how their feedback has been used.

8) Setting clear goals and targets for members. You can set goals for the community to achieve. Better yet, get members to list their skills, knowledge, and experience. Then find ways for them to contribute these things to the community.

This is a handful of ideas rather than an exhaustive list. The point is investing in the channels above will give you a community which outlives the demise of any single platform.

If you’re doing your job well, you should see the sense of community felt among regular customers (remember to skip the newcomers) steadily improve over time. This is the tangible success of your work. People move platforms a lot more frequently than they feel a sense of community.

It’s never a good idea to try and contain members in one place, nor chase after them from one platform to the next. That’s expensive and wasteful. You can gain better results from building a strong sense of community among members regardless of which platform they use.

Hosting and managing a community platform can help you achieve your goals, but nowhere near as much as fostering a powerful sense of community.

Should You Chase Engagement Or Chase Value From A Community? (it’s complicated)

The engagement trap is very real, it’s very dangerous, and most of us are caught in it.

But engagement itself isn’t bad. The problem is when:

a) You align your efforts to drive the most engagement.

b) Engagement is all your colleagues understand about building community.

In a perfect world, you would ignore engagement metrics entirely and focus on the outcomes of this engagement (i.e. if engagement drives more loyalty, satisfaction, leads, search traffic etc…you would measure those things instead of engagement).

But often you can’t easily do this.

Sometimes you can’t get the data you need. Other times, no-one seems clear what the goal of the community should be. And, most often, someone senior just wants to have a big active community at the moment for a reason even they struggle to explain.

You can push back a little, but pushing too hard to be measured by outcomes can create more value than it solves.

This happens often in our consultancy work too. The solution is to build your boss/client’s wishes into a longer-term strategic roadmap for your community.

If everyone understands driving engagement is part of a stepping stone to driving clear results, you can avoid the engagement trap.

In practice, this usually means you create a 6 to a 24-month roadmap with goals to hit such as:

  • Months 0 to 6: Reach a critical mass of activity
  • Months 6 to 12: Drive up engagement.
  • Months 12 to 24: Align members behaviors to most valuable actions.

(use this guide to help you with the exact metrics).

Each of these will also need its own strategic plan.

Now you have engagement as part of a longer-term process to driving results. You know exactly how much engagement you need to move to the next phase. Better yet, everyone can get on board and track progress.

Chasing engagement or chasing value doesn’t have to be two mutually exclusive options.

A Powerful Community Experience For A Short Period Of Time

Don’t try to imitate major community programs without their resources.

Ideally, every community effort would have a full-time community manager with a six-figure budget to build and support their audience.

However, most people are juggling community around other tasks with limited financial support.

The temptation is to launch a platform, drive members to it, and start responding to questions. But without a decent amount of time and money, this probably isn’t the most effective approach. It sets high expectations, spreads resources thin, and requires a big, long-term, commitment.

An easier approach is to deliver a powerful community experience at regular intervals.

Instead of having an ongoing community you can’t fully support, focus on powerful community experiences you can deliver.

You can nurture a sense of community in many different ways:

  • You can host monthly webinars with product experts where customers can join to ask questions.
  • You can invite customers to join you at headquarters a couple of times a year.
  • You can host weekly live twitter chats.
  • You can solicit contributions of customers each month and publish the best advice and tips in a newsletter digest.
  • You can create a podcast and invite contributions from members. You can encourage and promote the meetups of your members.
  • Etc…

A hosted platform is just one of many approaches to foster a strong sense of community. It can deliver great results, but it’s both time and resource-intensive. If you have neither, take a different approach.

It’s always better to deliver a powerful community experience for a short amount of time than a mediocre experience for a long period of time. It’s easy to build upon a powerful community experience than a mediocre one.

How We Helped Eventbrite Increase Community Participation By 160%

Last summer, we were hired by Eventbrite to work on their EventTribe community.

EventTribe is a really interesting customer acquisition community. The primary goal is to gather leads of significant value through the community. This meant the concept had to be about the topic (running successful events) and not about the product (the latter would only attract existing customers).

In this post, I want to share the process we went through.

(You can see the results for yourself here: www.eventtribe.com).

 

Background

EventTribe was an inception-stage community, our goal was to drive it to establishment and, eventually, maturity. This meant increasing the number of quality leads generated from the community while putting the site on the path to sustained growth.

To get started, we undertook three types of research, interviews, surveys, and analysis of community data.

1) Interviews with key stakeholders. The first step was to interview the key stakeholders. This is especially important to establish the value. For example, what qualifies as a lead? Is lead-scoring used? What is the process for passing a lead from the community to the sales team/process? Who are the best types of leads etc? These interviews also identified any areas of uncertainty among staff and the kind of training which would suit them best. This helped us focus our efforts in a few key areas.

2) Interviews with community members. We interviewed a range of community members and highlighted every possible useful point in the transcript. This revealed a range of challenges members faced, how they thought about the community at the moment (‘interesting, but many discussions weren’t relevant’), and opportunities the members might want to pursue. We dropped most of these ideas into the surveys (below) to validate it among the broader community.

3) Survey of the community. Click here to see the exact questions. We wanted to know who the active audience were, what type of events they ran, what topics most interested them, and what they wanted to see next. One of the key questions here is to let members rank which types of content they want to see and how they want to see it. The results broadly showed we had a big audience who run events for 101 to 500 members and want to learn event promotion, project management, and finding good vendors/venues. They also wanted this as quick tips, detailed guides, and interviews/AMA formats. The survey also revealed some other interesting challenges and information we would use later.

 

4) Analysis of the community data. The community data showed an increase in traffic (especially due to some paid social advertising), but a decrease in the number of members who were participating each month. We identified the exact areas where members were dropping out and the key challenge, relevancy.

Once the research was complete, we could begin making laser-focused interventions to improve the metrics we wanted to move.

 

Improving The Newcomer To Regular Conversion Ratio

The first challenge was to improve the newcomer to regular conversion ratio. This began by mapping out the current process. We reviewed every community touch point and developed broad recommendations to optimize each point. Then we prioritized them and decided which we had the resources to pursue.

(Aside, it’s often staggering how effective most of these ideas are, yet so few people talk about them).

Once complete, we pursued the process systematically.

 

Step 1: Increasing the number of visitors to the community

Remember the motivation model below?

Establishment-phase communities need to ramp up their awareness. This has to be done within the very structure of the community.

This began by looking at where members came from today and doubling down on the most successful channels. The data quite conclusively showed the Eventbrite site was the biggest driver of traffic (especially the blog).

We doubled down on this source of traffic at the expense of social. This included:

1) Inserting community-related messages in blog posts. This meant going through many of the old, but frequently visited, content published and adding simple links to the community.

2) Adding pop-up notifications during community webinars with top experts. These are very effective to drive traffic from a popular blog to a community and sourcing good questions.

3) Getting better at mentioning and promoting community activities on the blog in general. Going forward, we would collaborate better with the writers of the blog to mention and feature community activities where relevant.

As a result, traffic from the blog increased steadily and exploded with a monthly increase, so far, of nearly 230% (shown below).

We also undertook a detailed technical audit of the community. All SEO activities in a community are constrained by the platform (in this case Discourse), but the audit highlighted several opportunities. These included:

1) Shortening the title/banner of the community on Discourse. The current title tag and meta-description were too long, so we shortened this.

2) Reducing the size and content of the title of popular topic discussions. Same as the above, we had long category names which hurt our search traffic. So we reduced the size of the category titles.

3) Creating discussions around topics most likely to drive traffic (this included venues/vendors, AV needs etc…). Very specific topics (e.g. top event venues in London) seemed to be very popular for search (albeit less good for discussions).

4) Merging related discussions together. This is still a work in progress but will become increasingly important going forward.

5) Adding better meta-descriptions and copy to the category pages (e.g. the event planning page). Like most communities, EventTribe had category pages which were devoid of almost all SEO-optimized content.

These changes (almost certainly combined with the natural growth in long-tail search terms) increased traffic by around 37% (excluding Christmas period).

We also tried to build good relationships with partners and drive referral traffic. This proved to be a colossal failure. Generally speaking, partners weren’t as invested or interested in the community as we were.

However, overall the results were extremely positive. Traffic to the community has risen by 50% since September.

It’s definitely possible to increase this, but with limited resources we also need to ensure we can convert this traffic into engaged members of the community. This is where the real challenge begins.

 

Step 2: Increasing the number of visitors who register

Most communities, with some glaring exceptions in specific categories, have conversion (sign-up) rates that hover from 0.1% to 2%. By the time we had begun working on the visitor to registered members ratio, it had dropped to 1.77% (this often happens when you drive more traffic, the registration ratio declines).

 

Replacing the banner

The biggest problem was the design and layout of the community. At the time, it wasn’t great:

The background image was slightly jarring, the message was bland and contrasted badly with the background, and the sign up button was hidden in the top right corner.

The banner suffered from the same problem as most banners. It was dull, impossible to hide, and showed the same message to every member regardless of how engaged the member had been.

It was wasting the most valuable real-estate in the community.

Fortunately, because the community was on Discourse, we could revamp this to almost anything we want. We used some conditional logic rules to design a banner which had a clear call to action for new members. We also added a clear reason to join the community (i.e. what people get by joining). This came directly from the interviews we had undertaken.

This not only guided people to participate, but also highlighted the exact first steps we needed them to take. The ‘hide banner’ option in the top left was a useful touch for regular members.

 

Featured discussions at the top

We also worked harder to ensure fresh, engaging, discussions appeared at the top of the community. This meant people would genuinely want to join and participate in the discussion. The community is best for the ‘editors picks’ type of filter.

This was easy enough to do and was great for testing different things to see what people participated in.

These small tweaks doubled the number of visitors who registered to join the community from 1.77% to 3.43%.

These might sound like small figures, but consider this ensures our awareness efforts are now twice as effective. It means thousands of new members every year.

You can beat this if your community is brand new, by using pop-ups, and dangling incentives (e.g. sign up to get this free report), but we didn’t want to go down this path for various reasons.

 

Step 3: Increasing the number of registrants who participate.

The messaging on the conditional logic banners didn’t just ask members to sign-up and get started, it also guided them to introduce themselves to the community and ask their first question.

As they complete each task, a strikethrough’ would appear (we might replace these with ticks soon) so they could follow the journey.

If they completed all three, they would be moved to the ‘second banner’ where they would get a different set of tasks to complete (more on that in a second).

More than anything else, the banners immediately increased both the percentage of new members who made their first contribution and encouraged many lurkers to make their first contribution too. The percentage of newcomers who made a contribution has doubled to around 32%

While the overall number of new contributors has risen by 220%


(note, it looks a lot bigger on this graph as community-analytics base-rate is set to the minimum value instead of zero).

I suspect it would be very difficult to increase these conversion metrics any higher. Beyond 30% there tends to be a law of diminishing returns.

 

Step 4: Increasing the number of registrants who participate.

The next step was to increase the number of members who participated overall (i.e. get members to stick around and participate more).

This required some content programming, direct engagement via @mention groups, more conditional logic tweaks, improving @mentions too.

 

AMA Sessions

From the survey we identified the key topics members wanted to learn about and found experts who wanted to talk about them. Some of these proved more successful than others, however, they also spiked the traffic.

We even designed a custom banner for each person where we can quickly tweak the wording/photo for each new expert.

It would be interesting to test having multiple panelists to discuss topics over the course of a week. We tend to run sessions once a month, but these can last longer.

Thus far they have been successful, but there is plenty of scope to improve these. We’re still testing ideas.

 

Direct engagement via @mention groups

An often cited problem was the relevance of the content. There is a huge difference between people working on a global festival and those hosting a look bookclub meetup. We needed to increase the relevancy of content.

Discourse allows you to drop people into groups and @mention the entire group at once. Most people aren’t using these features at all.

The Eventbrite community allows people to add the events they’re most interested in on their profiles. We created a SQL query using the data explorer plugin on Discourse to list all members (and then all new members) by event type and then use the ‘bulk add to group feature’ to drop them each into unique groups.

We now have almost 30 groups separated by biggest interest. We’ve only just begun testing this, but I suspect it will prove quite effective at @mentioning small groups of people into relevant discussions (you can also use this for all newcomers).

 

SQL Queries For Other Members

We also created a few other queries to identify members at specific times when a direct interaction with the community manager could prove most valuable. This included:

  • New registrations previous 7 days.
  • Top 10% of participants (over past 60 days)
  • Members who were active 2 months ago but not the past month (i.e. people drifting away).
  • First-time contributors in past 7 days (see below)
  • Members who have joined but not participated.

These queries aren’t too complicated to create (or find someone to create) (see below) and they help the community manager build quick lists of people to reach out to with a specific message at a specific time.

 

Adding the badge to a banner

Another innovation we tried (we try new ideas on almost all client projects) was adding a badge to the banner below. This helped members see how they compared with other members and where they ranked overall based upon their user levels.

This needs a few tweaks (we might switch to ‘likes received’ rather than use levels), but the idea seems to be effective in driving more contributions as we will soon see:

Ongoing Conditional Logic in Banners

We also experimented with adding more conditional logic to the banners (so every option wouldn’t be struck out, as shown in the option above). The final list of conditional logic will include:

(note these all link to discussions/activities).

  • Banner 1: Getting Started
    – Sign up and get started.
    – Introduce yourself to the group.
    – Share a challenge and let’s solve it together!
  • Banner 2: Building the habit
    – Share your best event promotion tip.
    – Tell us what resources would help you run your events?
    – What’s the best event venue you’ve used?
  • Banner 3: Becoming a top member
    – Help answer five questions (and get your badge!)
    – Suggest a potential AMA speaker/interviewee for us.
    – Become a community volunteer.

This is in addition to the temporary webinar banner we add to the community. All these banners are implemented with some custom CSS in the Discourse themes.

The results have proven fairly positive. The number of questions asked by members has increased by around 35% (with some variation over Christmas/Easter).

The number of posts from active community members also rose by 35% from an average of 1.7 to around 2.3 (these will be skewed by the extremes, the median is probably a little lower – note this excludes posts by the community managers):

The Ultimate Metric – Active Participants

Perhaps the ultimate metric of any community’s success has been the ongoing increase in posting members as seen below. Thus far it’s risen by almost 160%.

Key Lessons

There are still a lot more things we can do here. It’s still a fledgling community with a relatively small target audience (event professionals in the UK). We haven’t yet done enough with gamification, a top contributor program, community volunteers, and lead qualification, but it shows how much you can achieve without any of these things.

1) You can achieve major increases without major platform changes. As we’ve tried to show here, you can achieve sustainably great results simply by making a few small tweaks in the right places without investing a fortune in a new technology.

2) Invest a lot of time to understand members. The interviews, survey data, analysis of community data take a lot of time to undertake, but they reveal almost everything you need to optimize engagement. Set aside 4 to 6 weeks just for this phase.

3) Law of diminishing returns. It’s not about trying to optimize everything to the max, it’s about investing your limited resources to achieve the best results. Beyond a certain level, it’s not worth the time to spend more time trying to optimize things. Focus on things which have the biggest, long-term, impact upon the majority of community members.

4) Beware of external events skewing your stats. Try to use a three-month average as disruptions such as Christmas, Easter, and February’s shorter month can play havoc with the stats.

5) Some things aren’t worth quantifying. These are plenty of things above we’re fairly sure are working, but we aren’t sure how best to quantify them. Some things take a longer period of time to have an impact. We also added the terrific community team to our training courses and tried to be better in how/what discussions we responded to within the community.

6) Learn quickly from your hits and misses. Not every discussion or activity is a hit and many are outright misses. Over time we test new ideas and get a sense of what it / isn’t working. Don’t keep pursuing a tactic which clearly isn’t working.

Over the years, we’ve become increasingly confident at following a process to increase participation and outputs in almost any community. The process begins with getting a full picture of the community data and then making laser-focused interventions over a period of time.

There is some technical work involved, but nowhere near as much as you might imagine. The majority of the work is understanding members in an unbiased and empathetic way. This is harder than you might imagine.

None of the above took a prohibitively long amount of time, cost a huge amount of money, or was technically impossible to implement. I really hope you can borrow a lot of these ideas in your own community.

Good luck!

p.s. if you’re running any sort of events, I strongly recommend you join EventTribe.

Building An Online Community: From Getting Started To A Community-First Organization

It’s hard to work in an industry without a clear roadmap for what you should be doing.

It’s quite likely you’re unsure how to benchmark how well you’re doing today or figure out what you should be working on next.

Even many of the community managers behind the web’s largest and most successful communities aren’t sure what they should be working on next. For example:

Should you move to a new platform?
Should you build subgroups for connecting members?
Should you find ways to integrate the community with the product?

In this post, we’re going to try an answer most of these problems by sharing an updated community template with reference points to guide your actions.

This post will hopefully help you figure out where you are now, what you need to do next, and avoid most of the common mistakes.

 

Benchmarks For Your Online Community

It’s common to find community managers toiling away developing a premium platform or a complex MVP program without having enough members to use it or plenty of questions to answer.

This ends up being a distraction. You should only be working on the activities which take you to the next stage of the community lifecycle.

It’s really easy to plot a path forward when you know where you are now.

This means benchmarking your community against others and general principles of growth and development. To accomplish this, you can use the updated community lifecycle below:


[click here to view the full image / download the PDF]

In each category of the lifecycle (on the left), you can identify approximately where you are now and what to work on next.

It’s not an exact science (and you’re probably going to be further along the lifecycle in some areas than others) but it’s a broad guide to help you develop your next steps.

For example, a client of ours is at the stage below:

Now this gives us a broad idea of what to work on next. You generally don’t want to be too far ahead or behind your current average in any single category.

We want to focus on the highest priority areas first to move everything into the maturity stage. Then we might work on advancing further. This would mean (by approximate order of priority):

  1. Add a simple gamification and reward system for great contributions.
  2. Develop an MVP program for top community members.
  3. Create content to satisfy likely search queries for the topic.
  4. Better categorize the best community content to be easy to browse.
  5. Aligning the community website copy to solve existing problems/seize new opportunities.
  6. Build a system for members to vote/rate the best content.
  7. Ensuring the community is better featured on the main company site.
  8. Driving specific promotional activities.
  9. Securing additional funding for the community team.
  10. Develop specific metrics to measure health and success.
  11. Building a data-driven framework for making engagement decisions.
  12. Improve the community newcomer spaces.

You wouldn’t try to tackle all of these at once, there could be 6 to 12 months of work here. But you would want to build a roadmap to tackle the first 3 to 6 tasks over the next few months.

You need to balance everything out and make consistent, steady, progress.

 

Avoiding The Biggest Mistakes When Developing A Community

1) Understanding the influence of the curve.

The curve is the absolute number of new members who join the community.

Under normal conditions, you start slow, gradually speed up, hit a peak, and then reach a maintenance level where you have a consistent number of new members which reflects the topic itself.

Be very aware here the total size of the audience and broader interest in the topic will have a bigger impact upon the community’s growth and development than any activity you undertake.

This is usually beyond your control. Your rate of new members will look more like a hockey stick if the popularity of the topic is exploding. Likewise, if you’re a private community, the rate of new members will probably flatline much earlier without a peak.

 

2) Critical Metrics

The number of active members, newcomers, and traffic above is a simple mean from studies of a few hundred communities. The standard deviation is extremely high however, so treat these as a rough guide rather than fixed rules.

If you’re looking to benchmark and track success, this is a simple way of doing it. Some organizations with million of customers should easily surpass this.

As you grow, you should have a rising number of active contributors, single posters, and visitors. Visitors tends to be 100x of the active members. If you run a private/closed community, these metrics will be completely different.

Avoid setting metrics over which you have no control. Notice how slowly growth happens in the early stages of the community and plan for it.

 

3) Platforms

With a few exceptions for customer support communities, you should begin with a simple platform that is already a habit for your target audience and try to drive activity there. This will usually mean a mailing list, slack, or (more likely today) Facebook groups.

As you grow, you might move to a hosted, licensed, community platform. This is largely to take advantage of lurkers who will want to find the useful information from your community and a handful of other unique features.

Some of the largest organizations also tend to develop their own bespoke platform to satisfy unique needs, but this comes after several years of work. Try to avoid using a premium platform or bespoke platform until you have a huge base of members eager to use it.

 

4) Strategy/Business Integration

You begin with a simple pilot program to validate the research you undertook in the concept stage. If that works, then you develop a complete strategic plan and start building more support for the community. Over time you should align the community to multiple benefits within the organization.

Eventually you become more specific about the ROI metrics, proving clear value, and becoming a community-first organization. This means seeking community support for initiatives and ideas before announcing them elsewhere.

For example, imagine you want to get a strategy approved by multiple stakeholders. You need to spend more time building relationships, understanding their needs, and adapting the strategy to ensure they feel they’ve had some control over the process.

Remember that building support will take a lot of time. Don’t try to force the community upon people. Instead figure out what your colleagues need and align the community to help. This is the simple secret to getting the support you want.

 

5) Growth Channels

The common mistake is to do a mass promotion of the community to the entire mailing list before validating the concept.

You don’t want the majority of your potential audience to see the community until it’s a fantastic hub of activity. This means initially you work from direct invites and biggest fans then expand gradually.

If you don’t have an existing audience, you can usually aim to attract members via paid social ads at around $1 per visit and up to $10 to $15 per conversion into a registered member.

Once the community has taken off, you want to ensure better placement for referral traffic, develop content and activities for search traffic, and try to drive word of mouth from existing members. Just don’t promote the community too widely, too soon.

 

6) Why New Members Join And Initially Participate

This changes over time. With the exception of customer support communities, people usually join to be part of something unique, different, and exclusive. They have a strong connection to the founder(s) and comprise the most hardcore fans or customers.

Over time this shifts as the community jumps from the most topic enthusiasts to those who have problems they want solved or want to be better within the field. This group requires more instant gratification to their problems.

The most common mistake here is to use copy in your touchpoints which doesn’t match what members need. For example, promoting the size or success of a community to members still seeking something unique, special, and exclusive. The second biggest mistake is never changing or adapting the copy as the community develops.

Eventually, most of the newcomers to the community will inevitably be newcomers to the field as well. This means you need to adjust the copy and content people see when they first visit your community to match.

 

7) Newcomers

The process for turning newcomers into active participants also shifts over time.

You might begin by @mentioning every member to the community as a personal welcome. But this doesn’t scale well (and it’s too effective). You gradually develop automated systems for converting members with welcome emails, an automation series, and volunteers.

You might also figure out a system to give newcomers unique roles and responsibilities within the community.

Avoid trying to develop advanced systems too early. In the early stages you can manually welcome every member. But beyond a certain scale this feels impersonal (e.g. mass welcomes) or simply doesn’t work. Make sure you slowly adapt your systems to do this automatically.

 

8) Visitors (lurkers)

Most people don’t do anywhere near enough to support the lurkers to their community. Most of the time, lurkers are restricted to browsing the latest posts or using the search box to find the information they want.

You need to build systems to highlight the best content for your members. This begins with editor’s picks and eventually goes one level further to create content that members can search for. You need to make sure this content is properly tagged and categorized so other members can quickly find it.

At the more mature level, you need to have accepted solutions, a knowledge-base, and a system for regularly updated old content to keep it fresh. Rating systems are also useful here.

 

9) Top Contributors

Don’t start jumping into your perfectly designed MVP system until you have a highly active, mature, community. Start by getting to know your top members and building good relationships with them.

Over time, you want to have them interact with each other and solicit their ideas and feedback on community content and activities.

Once you have a good group of top members, you might want to build an incentive program with gamification and unique privileges.

 

10) Timeline

This is probably the most variable part of the process. But, generally, you can expect the inception stage to take up to 3 months.

If it takes longer, you probably need to rethink the concept. The establishment stage will usually last 3 to 9 months (in total) – this largely depends on developing diversified sources of growth.

The maturity stages and beyond may take a few years.

 

Steady, Monthly, Improvement

There is rarely a silver bullet that will change anything. The successful communities on the web today were the result of steady, monthly improvement, with community managers tackling the next thing on the list.

When you begin working tomorrow, or move to a new job, benchmark where the community is now using this resource and design your plan of action to steadily improve the community. It isn’t easy work, but it’s exactly what you’ve been hired to do.

Good luck.

How Many Members Do You Need To Build A Million Dollar Online Community?

Most of us believe we need thousands, maybe millions, of members to have a really valuable community.

Even those that don’t dream of making their community bigger and having more active members.

This is usually because we believe three things:

  1. More members makes the community better.
  2. Getting more members is a good use of time/resources.
  3. Getting more members improves the value of the community.

There is a grain of truth here. If you’re just getting your community started, you definitely want to grow quickly to reach critical mass.

But once you’ve reached critical mass, adding more members doesn’t help you build a million dollar community. What does help is getting the best out of the members you do have.

In this post, I’m going to outline how many active contributors you should aim for, what a typical breakdown of a community looks like and the numbers that go into creating a million-dollar community.

 

Most Brand Communities Have Far Fewer Members Than You Imagine

Two years ago, we began to suspect most branded communities had far fewer active contributors than we believed.

So we scraped a random sample of communities from Lithium below and analyzed the results (shown below).

It’s possible our scrape missed a lot of data (and there is plenty of activity behind closed doors). However, we broadly discovered most communities have between 51 to 389 active contributors at any one time.

But is Lithium reflective of most communities?

In the past year, we’ve worked with Community-Analytics and two academics to collect data from around 200 communities hosted on Discourse. The communities were broken down by size (no. messages) and the results are shown below.

Again, the number of active contributors varies wildly, but there is a clear trend within the 50 to 400 region.

Most branded communities really don’t have that many members.

Unless you’re an outlier (work for a brand with a massive audience, using a totally different platform, or have a really explosive idea), then you’re not going to get more than a few hundred active contributors during any given month.

This gives you some reasonable benchmarks to aim for:

  • Bad = <100 – bad (unless you’re just starting out)
  • OK = 100 to 200 active contributors
  • Good = 200 to 400 active contributors
  • Great = >400 active contributors

(of course, if you feel your community is an outlier, set outlier goals. Just be clear about why your community is an outlier).

But how valuable can a brand community be with just a few hundred active contributors? Extremely.

 

How Can A Community Be Indispensable With Only A Few Hundred Active Members?

This is a lot like asking how your customer call center or marketing team can be valuable with only a few dozen staff members.

It’s not the size of active members, it’s the multiplication of their contributions which matters.

For most benefits of a community, innovation, call deflection, customer success/support, you really don’t need that many active members. Instead, you need members to do valuable things which are seen by a far bigger audience.

But not all active members are equal. If we break-down participation habits and tenure of members within a community, we get the data we see below (from 139 Discourse communities):

I’d interpret this as community contributors tending to fall within three buckets:

  • Single Posters. The single-poster group (typically people who have a question they need to be resolved), comprise around 43% of membership. They ask a question and then leave when they have an answer.
  • The Irregulars. This is the 2 to 4% of contributors who stick around to either ask one or two more questions or answer a question. The community isn’t a habit and they tend to come and go sporadically.
  • The 90+ Day Group (Top Contributors). This is the 16% of members whom have stuck around for 3+ months and tend to contribute most of the responses/replies to a community.

Pay careful attention to that 16% figure there. It means most of the value in branded communities is driven by only a few dozen (active contribs * 0.16) regular members.

That’s it….just a few dozen.

This might be the community equivalent of 1000 true fans. These few dozen are the critical group.

It really doesn’t matter how many active members you have, it matters how many true believers you have.

It ultimately matters how many people you have on the far right side on the member motivation model below:

I’ve seen plenty of communities struggling to succeed with a few hundred active members. The reason is simple, they don’t have any truly committed members creating real value. They just have irregulars and single-posters.

This is so important to understand. Almost all the truly valuable contributions to a community are coming from just a tiny group of active members.

This is the group you need to nurture through the motivation model above.

However this comes with the big caveat. These contributions only matter if you have a lot of people willing to read them.

 

The Lurker Multiplier

Lurkers multiply the value of your top members.

A single member might write a single post answering someone’s question, but if 10,000 people read it, it might deflect 10,000 calls.

It’s far better to have 100 members creating content read by 10,000 lurkers, than 10,000 members creating content read by 100 lurkers.

There isn’t much hard data on the number of lurkers most communities have. The client data we have varies between 99.80% and 95% of all visitors to the community. I wouldn’t be surprised if it stretched way beyond that for the larger communities too.

This is also heavily influenced by community type (esp. customer support) and community age (older = more lurkers). The bigger and older you are, the greater the imbalance of lurkers.

Let’s imagine you have a reasonable 1% ratio (99% of lurkers for every active member).

The median brand community will have around 162 monthly active contributors and 16,200 visitors.

This might not sound like much, but let’s start breaking down how valuable a community like this might be:

Imagine those 16,200 lurkers find the answer to their problem and don’t need to call customer service. At $3 to $5 per call that’s a cost saving of $48k to $81k per month ($576,000 to $972,000 per year).

Imagine just 5% of this group become customers. For a typical SaaS company with a $100 per month subscription, this could again be $81k per month ($972k per year)

Imagine if this 5% of these visitors become customers as a result of the community, again, we’re looking at $972k per year.

Imagine if you advertise jobs in the community and save $10k in headhunting costs per recruit or save $15k on every focus group project you used to run.

These aren’t fanciful made up numbers. They’re very real and very possible metrics that explain why just a tiny group of top contributors creating content read by a standard group of lurkers can be so valuable. But we haven’t even gotten to the big win yet.

 

The Big Win

As you grow, you want to align the community to achieve multiple goals.

You might begin with customer support and then also include feedback, lead generation, recruitment etc…

Now a community can quickly go from driving up to a million dollars return into several million dollars. All of it generated by just a core group of a few dozen active members.

You wouldn’t really need to think about trying to get as many members as possible, if your members are providing as much value as possible.

This is the incredible value that a seemingly small community with just a few dozen active contributors can provide to an organization. This is what makes a community the most cost-efficient way to achieve goals. It’s what turns a small community into an indispensable asset.

Putting It All Together

Ok, let’s put this all together into some key benchmarks and core principles:

1) Hit the upper quartile range for brand communities. This would be 163+ active contributors per month, 26+ regular members, and 16,300+ visitors. By all means keep optimizing search results, building partnerships, inviting people to join, and encouraging members to share material until you hit that number. Use the motivation model above to keep members active. Don’t let anyone bully you into trying to be Reddit.

2) Nurture your top contributors. Build strong relationships with each of them, connect them into their own tribe, deploy a super-user program, and guide them to make the best type of contribution they can make. This group needs to be as respected, connected, and as valuable as they possibly can.

3) Multiply the value of top contributors. This is the overlooked part. Make sure the best content is really easy to find. Drive a lot of traffic to it. You should see your visitor numbers steadily growing. Then align your community to achieve multiple goals (call deflection, feedback, retention, recruitment etc…). This is where you can double and triple the value of every member.

When most people think of a successful community, they usually think of the mega-communities and the big social networking platforms like (Reddit, Facebook, LinkedIn etc…).

But if you were to plot branded communities on a bell curve, you would notice the mega-communities aren’t just rare, they’re outliers. They’re statistical anomalies which bear no resemblance to the work you will be doing.

Ignore the big fish and focus on getting the most out of the members you do have, not chasing the members you don’t have.

Good luck.

Building A World Class Community Management Team: A System for Benchmarking Online Community Skills And Abilities

Imagine you decided to move into sales and on your first day, someone handed you a list of the organization’s top customers and responsibility for the entire CRM system.

No training, no support, no roadmap.

This is pretty close to what happens in community management today. Most people are suddenly handed responsibility for building a community from an organization’s top customers on an advanced technology platform.

Often they have limited training, support, or a detailed roadmap.

At best, this leads to communities failing to reach their potential, getting bogged down in common problems, or unable to show their value.

At worst, it leads to empty ghost towns or pointless casinos (communities with lots of meaningless engagement).

The level of training given to community teams today is abysmal. It’s the root cause of most of the problems you and your team are facing.

It’s important to make continual progress of your community team a priority. Your team, your members, and your organizations deserve better the best. In this post, we’re going to highlight how to benchmark yourself and your current team.

We’re going to identify the skills they need and how you can set reasonable targets for each of them.

Benchmarking The Community Team

We sometimes receive emails asking if one of our courses is right for a participant.

This is a hard question to answer without knowing someone’s ability. Most people don’t know how good they are because they have no benchmarks to measure themselves against. They use the size of their community rather than their own abilities.

We benchmark community professionals along five attributes (adapted from our friends at the community roundtable). These are below:

1) Strategy. This is the ability to develop and execute a community strategy which deploys the organization’s limited resources to maximum impact.

2) Engagement. This is the ability to proactively engage, nurture top members, and build systems to improve the overall participation environment of the community.

3) Content. This is the ability to create original content and drive high-value contributions from other members.

4) Technical. This is the ability to select, implement, and optimize a community platform. This includes resolving technical problems and managing vendor relationships.

5) Business. This is the ability to build allies throughout the organization, measure value, run a community team, and gather more resources for the community.

We break each of these down by four distinct levels ranging from ok to world-class.

You should strive to gradually upgrade yourself and the community team to a world-class level in each of these areas.

This is subjective, but I recommend copying and adapting our benchmarking resource below.
Score each member of staff between 0 to 4 on each of the five attributes.


(right click and ‘save as’ to download)

We’re going to break down each of these levels below:

1) Strategy (or strategic thinking)

When benchmarking someone’s strategic abilities, you want to track their journey from thinking strategically to having a codified and invaluable strategy everyone understands and supports. This increasingly relies on research, metrics, and project management skills.

Strategy is about allocating resources to have maximum impact. It’s not about trying to do as many things as possible, but deciding what’s worth doing and allocating maximum resources to ensure success.

Or, to use an analogy, it’s not about dividing resources evenly to fight every battle, but about deciding which battles are worth fighting (see this big wins talk).

The first level is to ensure all staff members are thinking strategically about how they spend their time. Are they constantly using available data to reviewing which activities they undertake are driving results and pursuing those which are most effective?

As your staff progress, you want them to be proactively researching what members want and using that data to improve the community. They should know how their tactics serve a strategy which serves an objective which serves a goal.

At the more advanced level, you want them to become great at segmenting members, ensuring members are making their most valuable contributions, establishing benchmarks, and pursuing reasonable community goals. The strategy should be internalized here throughout the entire community team with modeling of different inputs to achieve goals.

2) Engagement

Engagement skills are the core abilities of the community team to create the perfect environment for every member to make their best possible contribution to the community.

This begins at the lower levels with being a terrific community member.

Do your community staff resolve and escalate problems well?
Can they remove the bad material quickly?
Do they build positive relationships with community members?

As they move up the chain, they should focus on building systems which build a powerful sense of community and nurture superusers among the group. They should get better at building and optimizing the journey which turns newcomers into regular, active, members.

At the highest levels, you and your team need to be able to improve the resolution rates, address legal/brand issues, and ensure all staff know how best to engage members in the community.

3) Content

Content is one of the areas where everyone considers themselves an expert (aren’t you a great writer?). Content is essentially the ability to develop and facilitate the creation of valuable long-form educational or entertaining content across blogs, webinars, videos etc…

At the simpler levels, all members of your team should be able to synthesize great content from existing work and member contributions. This should be nicely designed and implemented across multiple platforms.

As you improve, you should be able to optimize web copy and improve conversion rates, increase search traffic, and build an editorial calendar. This requires reasonable copywriting and SEO abilities.

At the higher levels, your team should be able to ensure an editorial calendar is adhered to (surprisingly hard), develop automation campaigns, edit contributions of other members and persuade top experts to create great content for your community.

Finally, a great community professional should be able to commission ‘big win’ content projects (e.g. our platform selection tool) which goes far beyond a simple blog post or video. It brings in a unique, viral, idea to attract great search traffic, and has a unique design/development.

4) Technical

Far too many people in this field profess to ‘not being technical’. This isn’t good enough when your entire work depends upon being adept at managing a technology platform and what happens within it.

At the basic level, this requires knowing how the features of the platform work and being able to diagnose any potential problems which arise. Your staff should be able to learn this by testing things, experimenting in the community, and asking around in the vendor’s relevant communities.

Beyond this, you need your team to be able to resolve most issues independently, run SQL queries to get the data you need and make improvements to the structure and design of the community without help. This kind of knowledge is best gained through peer support.

As you reach the more advanced level, you want to know more about the platform environment, using data to improve the speed and functionality of the platform, and using the best features from any third party platforms to build the best community possible.

Finally, you want to be able to take responsibility for the entire vendor process and address legal/privacy/security issues which can arise.

5) Business

Business skills are the link between the community and the organization. This is about you being able to make the community indispensable to the organization. This begins with knowing how the community is supposed to help the business and the resources available to develop that community.

As you get better, you should become more adept at acquiring more resources by building a strong internal narrative and persuasively winning over any skeptics and key stakeholders within the organization.

Finally, this evolves into being able to attract and retain world-class community talent, build career maps, and build a community-first culture among the organization. The very best people I know have a pipeline of people eager to work for them. This doesn’t happen by accident, it happens by doing what one friend calls ‘building pipe’, constantly showing up, making connections, and knowing what talent you’re looking out for.

Set A Target To Improve Every 3 To 6 Months

Now you have your benchmarks, you can begin to set reasonable targets of improvement for each member of your team.

A reasonable level of progress is an increase in 1 level (of 1 attribute ) every 2 to 3 months at the first two levels and usually 3 to 6 months at the upper levels.

This gives your team a clear focus and lets you build a roadmap of what you expect over 6 to 12 months. This, in turn, lets you identify what kind of support you need to provide the community team to help them reach each level.

Avenues for Progress

Courses aren’t the only method of improving your community team or improving your own abilities. There are multiple channels available here, each can work in different situations.

  • Professional courses. I’d recommend our Strategic Community Management and Psychology of Community courses for strategy/engagement development.
  • Books. Focus on specific topic areas, not pop. business books. This tends to be good for content skills and some marketing/growth abilities.
  • Conferences. This is good for content/SEO skills, some engagement skills, and some highly focused areas. It’s good for building relationships which can help in other areas too.
  • Blogs. These are fantastic for most areas, especially psychology, marketing, SEO, and analytics. Find the right expertise here.
  • Peer communities. Both industry sites like CMX, Community Roundtable, FeverBee Experts, but also communities in each unique field like technology, journalism, copywriting, marketing, SEO etc…Encourage your team to identify problems, ask questions, and get help. Small peer groups of people working in similar communities is also a good idea.
  • Mentoring and support. This covers both informal mentoring and professional options. This is best for business skills, strategy, and some technical expertise.
  • Experimenting. Especially in technical (use a sandbox!) and some areas of engagement. You can run small trials to see what does or doesn’t work.

Ongoing Process

This is a process that never ends. The goal is to set benchmarks, track progress, and push for ongoing, non-stop, improvement from every member of the community team. Set a skills roadmap for every person you work with and compel both of you to review it every 3 months.

Good luck!

Community Website Design: Rules for The Banner

What do you notice about the following four communities?

Oracle Community

NTEN Community

IDERA Community

Dropbox Community

….they all have terrible banners.

Most community banners today are doing more harm than good. They’re static monstrosities filling far too much real-estate with bland messaging trying to appeal to every member segment.

A banner is not a game-changer for any community, but it is a useful tool to drive the kind of behavior you need, help with the signal to noise problem, and set the tone for a community.

But banners come at a big cost, they push activity off the page. They make it harder for members to see who or what is new in the community. The bigger the banner, the greater the cost. Your banner comes at the direct expense of activity.

 

The Big Problems With Most Banners

The problem with banners comes in 5 areas. These are:

1) The design. Many community banners have curiously bad design. This often includes an ugly palette of colors, text that doesn’t contrast well with the background, or bland photoshopped images.

2) The size. Most are far too big and take up far too much space. You generally don’t want to push activity below the fold.

3) The contents. No-one really cares much about being ‘welcomed’ to the community. Online communities have been around a while, most people know they can ‘connect’, ‘share’, and ‘learn’ from each other in one. What makes your community unique/different/surprising?

4) Static. The same message is often shown in the community regardless of whether members have already read it 10,000 times. It’s rarely updated with new information and members can’t get rid of it even if they wanted to.

5) Same banners appear to everybody. Far too often, the same banner is shown to every visitor regardless if they’re arriving for the very first time or visiting for the 10,000th time.

There are some exceptions to these challenges. A customer support community, for example, should have a question box right at the top for all visitors to easily ask questions. However, even this should be regularly adjusted and augmented.

 

The Design

Most organizations easily have the budget to do a better job with the design of their community banners and avoid most of the common mistakes. These tend to fall within 3 categories.

1) Not using brand colours. Sometimes you want the community to have a unique brand, but generally you want to keep the colors relatively on brand. Try to avoid using a full palette of primary colors here.

2) Stock images of people. Stock images of people don’t tend to work well in brand banners. Use either a generic image (like Fico) or avoid using images entirely. You don’t need an image for a banner to work well.

3) Contrast. Make sure the text contrasts well with the background. If it doesn’t, either change the color of the text/background or add a layer behind with a degree of opacity behind it. You can use any text if you had a layer behind it. We do this on FeverBee experts too.

FitBit Community

Notice how difficult it is to read the text above because of the weak contrast between the text and its background. 

Microsoft Community

Not a work of art, but the text contrasts well against the background, it avoids using stock images of people, and the calls to action are clear.

Nutanix Community

Try to avoid using stock photos of people. They appear on almost every community. Also avoid text that blends against the background.

Unbounce Community

On brand, easy to read, with key actions at the top.

 

Getting The Size Right

This should be easy. A banner should be as short as possible. It should take up 30% of the page at best, 50% at the very worst.

Any more than that, and you might want to consider removing copy. As we can see in the examples below, you can often move a few features around to reduce the size of the copy.

The Spotify Community

The banner takes up a huge amount of space which could be easily tweaked for a better experience.

Alteryx Community

(notice how by pushing the metrics to a side box they have freed up a lot of space for the activity)

You might need more height than Alteryx, but you should be able to reduce the copy or contents of a banner until it fits to less than 50% of the page.

 

The Message And The Call To Action

This is by far the critical part of it. It’s inseparable from the message itself. What you don’t want is a bland “welcome to the community” banner which offers nothing.

The right messaging and call to action may include:

  • Headline personifying what makes the community special (this is usually critical)
  • Clear next steps to take.
  • A search box (vital for customer support communities).
  • Trending topics
  • Most popular topics/questions
  • Registration/login information.
  • Videos/multimedia messaging.
  • Community Statistics (although these can usually be avoided)

The messaging and calls to action you use should depend largely upon who the audience is trying to reach and what you want them to do.

This will depend upon the type of community you’re trying to build as well. Trending topics works well for fields where there are new, major, issues. Registration/login works well for visitors. Videos/multimedia messaging works well when there are major announcements that you can frequently update. Search boxes work well for customer support communities etc…

Square Seller

The Square Seller community provides a pretty clear and handy headline.

Smartbear

The Smartbear community can remove the welcome message, but at least it gets the CTA messages directly at the top.

Optimizely

The messaging in the optimizely community is actually quite clear and specific, but the weak contrasts hurts the design.

AT&T

This is the opposite of what you want to do in the community messaging. A generic banner that adds nothing to the community

Zuora (90% of screen)

The Zuora messaging is weak, but the trending topics beneath the banner is really good.

Fico

The Fico community banner is clean, if not very inspiring.

Static/Never Changing Banners

With few exceptions, a banner which is static and rarely changes is never a good sign. There are two good solutions to this.

1) Regularly update the banner with new, useful, information. This means with new content/activity that members need to see. This works well when you make frequent new announcements and there are new things to see.

2) Let members hide the banner. One common problem is members can’t get rid of the banner even if they wanted to. This doesn’t make much sense. If members have read/seen the message, you may want to let them hide it.

Both are reasonable options. You can also update the banner based upon a member’s previous contributions to the community.

Secops

Once you’ve read it, you can click ‘got it’ and the banner is hidden. You can expand it later if you need to.

Intelex

You can use a banner to make regular, big, announcements. But try not to make them quit this big.

Showing the same banner to everybody

It make no sense to show the same banner to your first-time visitors, your newly registered members and your top community members.

The most common solution to this is to create two separate banners for members who are logged in from those who aren’t. The former focuses on activity, the latter focuses on signing up.

An even better solution is to use conditional logic to guide members to the next action they should take based upon their previous contribution to the community.

We’ve been exploring this below in our community.

FeverBee (visitors)

Visitors are shown the next action to take.

FeverBee (newcomers)

Members who have registered are then shown a banner guiding them to the next contribution they need to make.

FeverBee (regulars)

Once people become comfortable asking a question and getting a response, they’re nudged to provide more value.

FeverBee (Top members)

Very top members are shown their current level of activity and how they can get more involved in the community.

Summary

If you’re running a community, you probably should have a banner. The banner though has to drive real value.

It has to be well designed, not take up too much space, have a clear call(s) to action, allow members to hide it, and be updated frequently.

Don’t let the banner be an afterthought, it takes up the community’s most valuable real-estate.

A Detailed Breakdown of Autodesk’s Online Community

Autodesk has one of the oldest and most successful brand communities in the world.

If Apple and Airbnb showed how the largest brands run their communities (and StackOverflow showed what’s possible with a fully customized platform), Autodesk represents what’s possible with the tools most organizations have available today.

The community began as user groups on bulletin boards in the mid-90s. For a time Autodesk, sent their website visitors to separate user groups. In the early 00s, Autodesk reclaimed the communities on their own site and have steadily grown membership and activities ever since.

 

Structure of Autodesk’s Communities

Pay careful attention to how Autodesk has structured its community efforts.

Instead of trying to have a single community perform multiple functions, Autodesk has multiple communities performing (largely) single functions.

The communities are divided into the following categories (with some overlaps):

  • Product communities. These are largely communities for peers to share ideas and help each other get better at the topic.
  • Support communities. These are communities for people to solve their product-related frustrations.
  • Ideation communities. These are for customer feedback, testing new products, and suggesting ideas.
  • Peer group communities. Autodesk has communities for its University program, a developer network, and the MVP/experts program.
  • Social media platforms. This includes a large collection of blogs and social media accounts.
  • Multiple languages. Autodesk has distinct communities which cover Chinese, French, Turkish, German, Spanish, Portuguese, and Russian.

The structure of a community program changes everything. Autodesk structures communities by their unique purpose, audience segments, and functions. The benefit of this is each community can use software and have a design fully suited to achieving its goals. This ensures Autodesk gets the maximum value from its community.

The downside is Autodesk might end up having multiple communities competing for the same group of members. This can be overwhelming to members and strangle activity for some groups.

  • Key Lesson 1 : Mature communities shouldn’t focus on a single stream of value, they should support multiple areas of the business.
  • Key Lesson 2 : As you grow, you want to fragment the community by unique purpose of the community (not by the unique groups you’re working with).

 

HOMEPAGE

The multiple community structure allows Autodesk to create multiple homepages. Each homepage can be designed for its specific communities. In practice, these homepages fall within three categories.

1) Product Support Homepage

Most Autodesk communities are support communities. These are all mostly in the same format as shown below:

Key Lessons From The Homepage(s)

  • The homepage is designed to encourage members to browse to a specific forum before asking a question. The search box and ‘new post’ option are moved to the side and not given the priority they usually are in support communities. This is generally against best practice. Most people in a support community don’t want to browse a forum, they want to either search for an answer or ask a question.
  • Showing popular solutions and common issues is terrific for dealing with questions which are asked most frequently and questions which are new/trending right now (as happens often after a new product update). Many members won’t know the precise words to use in their question, but seeing the obvious answers helps. It might be good to extend this a little further.
  • Getting started, tutorials, and troubleshooting are all displayed in about the right place. These help members solve common problems and use the community better.
  • At the bottom is the Autodesk Expert Elite members. This is a simple and effective way to highlight best members. Some communities put this group at the top, this is a mistake, being featured on a website has as minimal impact upon participation.
  • The right-hand side shows the basic product download and installation tips. This is a handy feature. It helps more members solve their problem before asking a question.

 

2) The Ideas/Inspiration Homepage

The product-communities (in practice, education communities) are designed to showcase the best work of members using its products. These are often visual and encourage members to upload their work.

Key Lessons

  • The product communities are designed differently to allow members to showcase what they have been doing and share proactive advice. These are generally set up to allow members to share what they have created rather than asking questions about how to create things. The goal in most non-support communities is to help the best material rise to the top.
  • The gallery at the top is ideal if the product/service itself is visual. It’s also kept minimal so visitors can see other activity as well.
  • Showing the most popular forums makes sense in these communities. You want members to browse and be inspired. They’re not looking for anything specific. They want to be there. You could equally show the latest or most popular discussions here.
  • The latest blog posts widget is also useful here, but it has to be kept up to date with fresh content. Autodesk achieves this well.
  • The latest events probably belongs as a side widget and not on the homepage itself, people can see it but only a small percentage of the audience will ever be able to attend.
  • The other useful feature would be a reddit-style list of the most popular discussions or articles shared within the community. This happens on the Instructables site. This helps the best content rise to the top and makes it much easier for members to browse articles.

 

3) International Communities

It’s never easy figuring out the best way to structure international communities. Do you use conditional logic based upon someone’s IP address to guide them to a specific location? Let members highlight what language they speak and then adjust it? Or give people a list to choose from.

Autodesk (below) takes the simplest route and shows all the international communities in a single list. This is usually a good idea and removes a lot of fiddly technical issues.

REGISTRATION AND ONBOARDING

Autodesk has a reputation for having an award-winning registration and onboarding system. In 2013 the entire platform was revamped. This led to a revised onboarding system.

 

1) The Registration Process

The on-site registration process is clean and easy enough. You begin with a simple profile completion form with some conditional logic and a password prompt.

Once completed, you’re invited to fill in some member registration data.

  • This is a considerable amount of information. However, it’s not required. You can skip the entire stage. You’re asked to use your real name, but it’s not required. The interface is clean, photo upload works well, and it’s clear what will be shown in your public profile.
  • Once this is complete, you’re dropped into your profile page. This section is a little disappointing. There isn’t really much guidance from this point for what to do next. Dropping members into a new member area would be better.

  • Verifying the email is kept clean and simple, with a direct URL to use if the button fails.
  • Once complete, you’re again taken to a separate page and dropped into the profile page. This misses the same opportunity to drop people into something specific.
  • You also receive a message (with a username chosen for you((?)) which highlights your new profile rank. This feels a little confusing and unnecessary at this stage for a new member. Far better to use this to get members to do something specific.

2) The Welcome Email

The Autodesk Welcome email (download the PDF) is the beginning of a 3-part series to engage people within the community. The first email invites members to:

  • Introduce yourself.
  • Check out the community etiquette
  • Search for existing solutions
  • Create and participate in discussions.

The translations into multiple languages is a neat touch.

The email is clean. It might be worth pushing the community etiquette lower and moving up creating and participating in existing discussions to engage people immediately within a discussion.

 

PARTICIPATION

Ensuring it’s easy to ask questions and participate in the community is the critical feature of a community platform. Autodesk’s community ticks most of the right boxes here.

Asking a question

  • Autodesk passes the test of ensuring responses to previous questions appear when you begin searching for an answer. It’s also notable accepted solutions appear higher than questions without a solution (Apple!).

  • Asking a question is well executed here. The product and board are automatically selected. There is a very quick line of advice to ensure people ask a good question (this could benefit to a link/drop-down). The introduction of a screencast is a terrific touch. Encouraging members to add screenshots and videos is a really great idea. The only possible improvement is automatically suggesting some relevant tags (similar to Apple’s community).

List of Discussions 

The forums are very much at the world-class level of best practice. All posts are displayed by the latest update with pinned posts on the most entertaining or most important ideas. This is a great use of pinned topics. You can also browse the accepted solutions and unanswered questions.

The hover text is also a nice touch and saves people clicking through to discussions which aren’t relevant to them.

Replying To A Discussion

A discussion itself is a little clustered with potential options with two reply buttons, 4 sharing icons, profile details, report flags, topic-dropdown options, in-discussion drop-down options, kudos, adding tags, and asking if the discussion was helpful.

You don’t need both a kudos and helpful discussion, it would be easier to use a ‘me too’, a response, or a helpful options and remove everything else (the other options will never be used anyhow). This drifts away from best practice here.

 

PROFILE PAGES

The profile pages are generally used as status symbols within the community. This generally works well. It would be worthwhile moving rank/kudos/solutions/posts into the grey space above.

GAMIFICATION

The Autodesk Gamification system leaves a lot to be desired. It’s opaque, largely meaningless, and misses out on plenty of opportunities to drive high levels of engagement and activity. This is the only public post I could find which explains the system.

This explanation invites more questions than it answers. There are 13 unique levels, but there are no obvious benefits or unique badges for achieving each level. It’s not even clear how to reach each new level. This is a huge missed opportunity for a community as successful as Autodesk. Autodesk also doesn’t appear to be using any unique badge system. The Apple community has a far superior system.

 

IDEATION

The Autodesk community has an ideation area where members can suggest ideas which might be implemented in the product.

Autodesk communities host ideation areas for many of its products. Members can suggest ideas and watch progress on those ideas over time. The green and red bars work well to highlight the current status of the idea. However, many of the ideas have been under review for years. It wouldn’t be unfair to assume ‘under review’ is where ideas go to die so the member doesn’t need to experience a rejection of the idea. It would be easier to be clear and honest about what’s happening.

The kudos and comments is an interesting feature, but could be greatly improved within the community if more people were using it. At the moment, the limited use in many of these areas is a real problem. It might be worthwhile only opening these areas in the communities where there is clearly a big demand for them.

 

Summary

Overall, Autodesk has a well developed community ecosystem with millions of responses to hundreds of thousands of questions. The platform is largely designed in line with best practices with some clear areas of improvement in gamification, asking questions, and ensuring key areas are kept up to date.

Keeping Engagement High As Your Online Community Grows

Don’t believe the “our members are too busy to participate” myth.

Time is about priority and priority is about relevancy. If your community is helping your members solve their toughest problems right now, they will always find the time to visit.

The problem is most communities don’t get their signal to noise balance right. They aren’t helping enough members achieve the goals they have right now. They’re not making their community relevant enough to their members.

 

The Signal Is About Relevance

If you made a list of your priorities today, you wouldn’t name long-term ambitions nor a strong desire to ‘connect’, ‘share’, or ‘join the conversation’.

The biggest priorities for us are the things that have the most important outcome to us (impact) right now (immediacy).

We can see examples of these in the table below:

The key to overcoming the signal to noise problem is to ensure as many of your visitors as possible see community activities related to the top left box.

But this is more difficult than it might first seem and changes at each stage of the community lifecycle. This means you need to ensure you have the right mechanisms for your stage of the community lifecycle.

In this post, we’re going to explain what these mechanisms are and how to use them.

 

How To Keep The Signal Strong In Increasingly Noisier Communities

Separate signal from noise requires a filter. There are five broad types of filter which you can use across the four stages of the community lifecycle. These are chronological, editor’s picks, member-tagging, popularity, and artificial intelligence.

As you can see above, as you grow you should gradually invest more time and money to build bigger and better filters.

Key point: Don’t stick with the filter you have as your community grows. You also need to develop better ones. Members will usually push back at first, but you need to be sure you keep pushing for the filter you need.

 

Inception Stage – Chronological Updates

If you get a good, focused, community concept early on (and you’re clear about the type of community you’re trying to build), your signal to noise ratio should be strong.

Early-stage communities should be all about signal. Almost 100% of updates should be relevant to what brought most people to the community. If they’re not, your concept is too broad (p.s. this is why many communities don’t take off).

The main filter here is chronological. When everything is relevant, members just need to know what’s new compared with what they have seen already. This is a list of posts by date posted/updated.

Even the largest sites, like Facebook, began with a simple system of showing all updates chronologically.

Your main task here is to keep the filter clean by weeding out the few posts that are outside the community’s focus.

 

Inception / Establishment Stage – Editor’s Picks

As your community grows to around the 100+ active participants region and you near critical mass, it becomes impossible to keep up with every update posted. This is where you need to make sure members aren’t missing out on the best stuff.

This is where you use editor’s picks.

This means you use sticky threads, blog posts, newsletters, and community digests to highlight the content you think most people in the community should see.

You should be helping members see the most popular/useful items of content in your community regardless of when they were posted.

Even some of the largest platforms, e.g. Slideshare, still use editor’s picks to highlight the best contributions others should read.

There are two key challenges here.

  1. Ensuring the quality of any ‘selection’ remains high. Some people fall victim to doing daily or weekly picks regardless of quality. Wait until you have enough quality contributions or you dilute the power of a pick.
  2. Reading enough contributions and identifying the best content. This becomes increasingly time-consuming.

 

Establishment/Maturity – Popularity Filters

As you reach the maturity phase of the community lifecycle, you will have too much content to process everything yourself. You’re also not the best judge of what’s the best content in the community compared with thousands of members.

This is often the stage where it makes sense to move platforms.

At this level, you want to use popularity filters to ensure the best content can rise to the top. This usually uses one of three metrics.

  1. Most visited. This is the number of users who have visited within a recent period of time. This usually highlights the most useful or entertaining piece of content.
  2. Most commented upon. This is great for most engaging topics – often the most controversial.
  3. Highest rated. This uses the number of upvotes (sometimes weighted by the ranking of the user) to show the content members like the best. This is a really important score.

All three have their place. Highest rated and most visited is best for lurkers, most commented upon is best for regular members.

Ideally you show the member the most popular content within the past week, yet also show the most popular within the past hour (trending topic), week (popular topic), month (top content), and ‘all time’ (best content).

However, be aware that you will probably need to manually remove some topics or set stronger filters. Sometimes old content which most members have seen is indefinitely the highest rated or most popular material every week.

Your goal is to allow members to quickly find the best content without having to browse through hundreds of posts. This only works when you already have a lot of activity.

Most major platforms enable some form of these already without much difficulty.

Your main work here is testing and managing different filters to get the best results.

 

Maturity Stage – Developing Unique Segments

As you grow past establishment stage, you begin to attract a more diverse group of members whose needs begin to diverge. Some people make the mistake on doubling down what’s worked in the past and focus on what they know best.

This limits the potential popularity of the community.

What’s most popular will increasingly be irrelevant to minority groups within the topic. The better solution here is to start categorizing and tagging members into distinct groups. Then you serve them the content that is most relevant to them.

The first part of this is to figure out a good system of tagging people (tagging works better than categorization here, people might be interested in more than one topic). You have four options for this.

  1. Create new groups/categories and let people join them. This is the simplest option, but most members won’t join any groups and you might be left with vacant areas of the site.
  2. Manually tag people by topics they seem interested in. This works better in smaller communities, but is a great way to test potential tags and ideas.
  3. Create a profile question and add people to the relevant group as a result. This works well for new members, but not so well for existing members.
  4. Run a SQL query to see who has visited or participated in which topics and then assign them tags as a result. This works very well, but requires some technology support. You can do this once or on a monthly basis. Begin with a few key topics at a time. It’s also possible your top members will participate in almost every discussion.

It’s usually best to focus on each unique segment at a time and ensure there is enough demand for the segment to make it worthwhile. You also need to check you have the resources to cater to them.

Once you have your segments, you can start sending them newsletters, @mentioning them by group to important discussions, or notifying them of new, popular, content in the community. This can be done manually or, ideally, automated. You shouldn’t attempt this stage until you have more resources to make it work.

 

Maturity/Mitosis – AI/Machine Learning Recommendation Systems

At the most advanced level, you should begin to see AI and recommendation systems. These essentially assign a score to each past member activity and use a weighted score to predict other relevant discussions members might be interested in. This is known as an algorithm.

These algorithms run each content through a relevancy filter of their own based upon popularity, existing metrics, content of the post, before using your past activities to determine if it will show it to you.

They’re not perfect, but they do improve with every click. Some of the best, like Amazon, Facebook, and Quora, perform remarkably well when showing members content they need to see.

At the simpler level, any post you read will also highlight other relevant posts. This is included in many of the most popular community platforms today. At the more advanced level you need to design more complex systems to handle who wants to see which information (and from whom).

 

Summary

Don’t rush to move up to the next filter until you have the level of activity to make it worthwhile, but don’t be too late to move neither.

You need to carefully balance your limited resources with the opportunity to develop increasingly advanced filters as your community grows. If you get this right, you should never have the ‘too busy to participate’ problem again.

p.s. Final chance to sign up for your Strategic Community Management and Psychology of Community courses

6 Strategic Plan Templates For Online Communities

Introduction

If you don’t have a clear and simple strategic plan you’re either relying on guesswork or using whichever tactics drive the most engagement.

Doing this work at the professional level is all about executing a strategic plan. It’s where you know your goals, you know your objectives, you know your strategy, and then you execute the tactics best designed to achieve that strategy.

In this post, I want to outline six broad strategic plans which have been successful for clients we’ve worked with in the past (or, in one case, a course student). Consider these ‘off the shelf’ strategies you can use for your community work.

Don’t use them wholesale, but adapt them to suit your needs.

 

Template 1: Advocacy Communities

Advocacy communities are designed to get customers to plead the case of the brand to non-customers.

Picture these efforts on a continuum. At one extreme you have cult fans who support you because they love you. Supreme and HarleyDavidson probably fall into this group. At the other extreme, you have reward/incentive-driven communities. Most of Influitive’s clients fall into this group.

Between the two, you have word-of-mouth marketing efforts. This is when when people who know you/like you share something you’ve created because it’s remarkable, involves them, or helps the audience look good.

Key Behaviors

The most common behaviors here, in order of value, are typically:

  • Direct selling/referrals to others. If a customer personally invites someone else to become a customer for the brand or make referrals to a sales team to someone who would be a good fit for the product, that’s a big win.
  • Writing customer reviews. This includes writing positive reviews on sites like Amazon, Goodreads, TrustRadius, and any other comparison site.
  • Creating brand-related content. This is when a customer creates positive articles, videos, or podcasts about the product. Gamers do this on Twitch and YouTube all the time.
  • Sharing content on news/content on social. This is where members share discounts, announcements of new releases, or any other brand-content to others.

 

Strategic Plan Template – Video Game Advocacy

The challenge here is to design community objectives (member behaviors) which achieve two goals. First, they must directly help the community achieve its goal and second, they must match what different member segments are likely to do.

Our strategic plan may look like the below:


All of this should be based upon research. By the end you should have a small list of 5 to 7 tactics which you will commit significant resources to executing. If you get this right, each member segment will be making their best possible contributions to the community.

 

Template 2: Engagement-Driven, Advertising-Supported, Communities

There is only one kind of community where maximizing engagement is a reasonable target and these are communities driven by advertising.

Most of the big social networks (Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest) fall into this category. As do sites like Reddit, StackOverflow, and Nextdoor (plenty of smaller, hobbyist, sites fall into this category too).

Key Behaviors

The key things you need members to do here typically include:

  • Getting members to organize members in their own groups. A key principle of exponential engagement growth is fostering sub-groups to increase advertising inventory and member time on platform. This means identifying and nurturing people to run parts of the community.
  • Ensuring members join and participate in these groups. You can’t have successful groups unless you can get members to join and participate in these groups.
  • Keep members actively engaged. You need to persuade people to visit and participate frequently to keep the community going.

 

Strategic Plan Template – An Engagement Platform

The challenge for an engagement-driven community is growing at high-speed. This example included the following:

For each group you want to amplify a unique motivation. This motivation will be very different for top contributors compared with, say, newcomers or lurkers/visitors. As the platform grows larger, you will need far more specific segmentation of the audience.

 

Template 3: Lead Identification/Generation Communities

Lead generation (and identification) is one of the most underutilized uses for a community. Members provides useful information which could identify them as potential leads for the sales team.

Bringing a list of 50+ leads to your next meeting is a good way to build internal support. However, be careful not to invade the privacy of your members or spam them with unwanted offers. Any outreach from a brand representative needs to be done with careful consideration towards the mindset of the member.

Key Behaviors

Members can identify themselves as leads in multiple ways. These usually include:

  • Downloading content/attending webinars. Members who submit their details to download product/service related content/attend webinars can be considered as strong community leads.
  • Sharing problems the product can solve. If members share a problem which the company can solve, someone can reach out to them and ask if they would like help.
  • Creating content which attracts more search traffic. If members create content which attracts high search traffic, this could generate leads through natural awareness.
  • Pre-purchase behaviors. Using a lead-scoring system, you might identify potential leads through the discussions and posts members click on.
  • Completing surveys. Occasionally, members might reveal themselves as fitting a lead profile through completion of a survey.

 

Strategic Plan Template – A Large Consultancy Company

Developing a strategic plan for a consultancy company tends to be easier than any other goals. Note, below, the type of platform you use to build this kind of community might be different from a support or advocacy community. Sometimes, you might not need much member to member engagement at all.


Each of the objectives above should help drive increased search traffic and identify leads within the community.

 

Template 4: Innovation and Insights Communities

We’ve covered this recently. There are plenty of ways members can help drive new insights and innovation. These typically come in the forms of:

Key Behaviors

  • Generating product ideas. This covers all solicited ideas in ideation-driven platforms.
  • Voting on product ideas. This is self-explanatory, members vote on the ideas they like best.
  • Providing feedback on the product/service. This includes every complaint, bug, or frustration members express which can be useful feedback.
  • Participating in surveys/interviews. This is useful solicited qualitative and quantitative feedback.
  • Expressing sentiment. If you track what members say they like or dislike you can gather a lot of useful insights.
  • Engaging in trackable behavior. This includes tracking specific behavior and outcomes e.g. what content or discussions people like best.

Ideation/soliciting ideas tends to gain the more attention but is also the least successful. Better feedback usually comes in response to things members can see, touch, and do.

 

Strategic Plan Template – SaaS company

Many SaaS companies are gradually shifting their community from customer support to insights and innovation. This means rethinking what members are going to do within the community. A recent strategic template included:


This approach aims to maximize the number of valuable insights generated by the community. We could equally add surveys/interviews at convenient times as an additional objective here.

From this, you should be able to use our insights report template and capture the main insights for the engineering team.

 

Template 5: Support Objectives

Support communities are the easiest type of community to create.

You launch a platform for people with a lot of questions and divert traffic from your website to this platform. It’s also the easiest community type to connect to direct cost savings. Most organizations with 100k+ customers should consider building a support community.

Key Behaviors

  • Asking questions in the community (instead of support channels). This is obviously a critical behavior for a support community to succeed.
  • Answering questions in the community (with empathy!). This is equally as important. Questions without solutions are worse than no questions at all.
  • Searching for an answer in the community. The majority of members should be able to find the answer without asking a question.
  • Voting and rating answers in the community. You need help from members to vote and rate answers within the community. This helps the best solutions rise to the top.

 

Strategic Plan Template – A Large Consultancy Company

Strategic plans for support communities are usually fairly transferable from one type of community to the next. The key difference is you usually don’t have regulars. You usually have top contributors, a small group of irregulars, then a large group of lurkers and visitors.


There are other ways to achieve these objectives (especially with top contributor programs), but the objectives usually remain relatively the same. Most internal collaboration communities would also fall under this category.

 

Template 6: Knowledge-Sharing Communities

Knowledge management (KM) communities (and Communities of Practice) are unique in they often span many of the different archetypes above.

However, the typical KM community emphasizes documenting and keeping knowledge up to date. This saves people time and helps them do better work.

Key Behaviors

The key behaviors here usually include:

  • Documenting a best practice/lesson learned/templates. This includes actions taken, what worked, where to find useful information, revenue spent, how it was measured etc..This also covers templates for future projects.
  • Keeping and updating previous content. Once content has been shared, it needs to be kept relevant and updated in a systematic way.
  • Tagging and properly storing information. People need to be able to find the information. This means it need to be stored in the right place, with searchable names, and properly tagged.

This is a simplistic overview that becomes more complex as the volume of information increases (e.g. what if you have 5 different versions of templates floating around or 50,000 employees across 8 languages?)

 

Strategic Plan Template – A Management Consultancy

KM communities will have the most flexibility among the strategies you can deploy. Sometimes appeals to honor and pride work well and sometimes appeals to collective rewards work, and sometimes fear of punishment works best.


Above we’ve largely used appeals to the better nature of members rather than resorting to punishments. But you can adapt as needed.

Summary

This isn’t a definitive list of community types. There are plenty of communities based around collective action, crowdsourced fundraising, and plenty other archetypes.

This should, however, cover the most common community goals and the kinds of strategic plans you might develop to support them.

There are multiple different ways to achieve the same community goals through different objectives, strategies, and tactics. The principle is to ensure everything matches up in the most direct and logical way possible. The templates above might help.

p.s. We’ve opened registration for our Strategic Community Management course.

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