Month: October 2008

3 Pieces Of Advice About Inviting People To Join Your Community

October 12, 2008Comments Off on 3 Pieces Of Advice About Inviting People To Join Your Community

Invite people to join your community one at a time.

Spread the invitations over two weeks

Invite the best people last.

The more invitations you write, the better they become. By the 20th e-mail, your invites should be perfect. This means you need to spread the invites out over a week or two. This gives you time to see what’s working, and perfect your later invites.

So the people you most want in your community, should be the last ones you invite.

Chartered Institute of Marketing Prize

October 10, 2008Comments Off on Chartered Institute of Marketing Prize

I have won a prize.

The University of Gloucestershire has awarded me the Chartered Institute of Marketing Prize. The annual prize is given to the marketing student who graduates with the highest scores.

I'm proud to have won it.

The Best Builders Perform Magic With Whatever They’ve Got

October 10, 2008Comments Off on The Best Builders Perform Magic With Whatever They’ve Got

I think you need to redo the website.

Or demand your legal team lets you say whatever you want.

And convince your CEO to participate in the forum.

Any community builder can complain about the constraints. The best work their magic within them. You’ve probably been hired for just this reason, the client couldn’t make it work within the constraints.

Your job is to stretch the infrastructure wider, spread the resources further and prove that some constraints can be conquered.

So be creative:

If the interface is too complicated to newcomers, create a simplified 101 training course. Award some members expert status and let them buddy up with newcomers. The more people the experts pull through, the greater reward. Make it a competition with a huge prize.

If the legal team wants everything moderated, don’t bemoan them, bring them abroad. Invite the legal team to train a group of community members into a Reporting Squad. Their eyes and ears on the community. The group runs every comment and notice against a checklist and highlights causes for concern quicker than the legal team could catch them.

If there is something you can’t do, spark the initiative in your community to do it themselves. Looking at the free software available today, there’s very little that motivated groups can’t do for free. If you can just motivate them.

Turn every constraint into an opportunity. If you really can’t make it work, don’t whine, just quit.

Create a Missing Persons List

October 9, 2008Comments Off on Create a Missing Persons List

Does your community struggle with people disappearing?

Create a weekly missing person's list.

Keep it fun. Each week, create a list of 10 – 20 members who haven't been such much recently.

Each name has a very brief bio, maybe a 'last seen' and a means of getting in touch. Then call upon your community to invite them back. No-one gets left behind!

The Difference Between Building and Managing

October 8, 2008Comments Off on The Difference Between Building and Managing

Building a community is like pushing a car uphill. It’s a lot of effort. Gradually you build momentum and the hill gets less steep. Then you get to a point where the car starts to roll away from you, and you walk away happy*

Managing a community is keeping that car on the road as it speeds away. You have to make sure it doesn’t crash, run out of fuel or neglect it’s maintenance.

to put it more literally: Building is about creating the right structure, cajoling the right people and creating an autonomous group that can thrive without you. Managing is about keeping the group together, keeping clear communications between client/community and ensuring the community doesn’t collapse.

* Please don’t ever do this.

How To Draw A Community

October 8, 2008Comments Off on How To Draw A Community

This is a complicated, but brilliant, idea. Grab a big sheet of paper and draw out how the community is going to work. It forces you to think with absolute clarity.

Think of it as a flow diagram, only a little more fun. Here are a few of the things your diagram might include…

  • You: Create yourself as a square, circle or whichever shape you like. You community begins with what you do, what your actions are, who you contact. So be specific about what you (not the client, not the customers) are going to do.
  • Client. Where is the client in this, what inputs/work will they need to put in? Draw out where.
  • People. Hopefully categorised people. Which groups are going to do what?
  • Links: Show the links (communications) between people. Each link (a line/arrow) should have 3 things: Motivations, Methods and Message
    • Motivations: On each line connecting people include explain why they are doing it. What’s the benefit to them?
    • Methods: How are people going to communicate with each other? Is it going to be by e-mail, in person, through forums, by phone via blogs?
    • Message: What are people telling each other. Don’t leave anything to chance. Work out what sort of messages you believe people need to say to each other.
  • Two Loops. Your diagram should have two very important loops. Without either, you’re guaranteed to fail.
    • Loop 1: The first loop is what is going to keep existing members coming back. e.g. Facebook has people writing on your wall and sending you e-mailed notifications.
    • Loop 2: The autonomous loop which gets existing members inviting new ones into the cycle without you. Sure you can keep fuelling the fire, but it shouldn’t burn out as soon as you’ve gone.
  • Tactics to Grow. Create boxes/shapes for tactics/strategies you want to use to grow the community. Place them at the points you believe they are needed to grow.

The more detailed and precise this diagram is, the better and easier your community will be. You can also test it in stages, or create alternative routes if something might not work. What else would you add?

If you can’t draw it, you can’t do it.

The Dos and Don’ts of Outreach

October 7, 2008Comments Off on The Dos and Don’ts of Outreach

Please don't give in to temptation. You can invite thousands of people to join your community in minutes, but don't do it.

This is the single, most critical part of your work. If you get it wrong, you've just repelled thousands of potential members. Probably for good. Every e-mail can spell the difference between a lifelong customer or a customer vigilante.

With that in mind, here is a good list of Dos and Don'ts in your outreach. Please forgive the torrid HTML.

Do.. Don't..
Personalise every e-mail with this information Mail-merge or copy/paste e-mails
Carefully select who, when and how to invite Invite everyone indiscriminately
Explain why you selected them Cluster people into general groups, e.g. "farmers"
Call members if you know them. Call numbers from a list
Treat the e-mail as the beginning of a conversation End the e-mail without a question or an opportunity for them to consider
Ask for their ideas to improve the community Fail to act on them, or celebrate those that suggested the idea
Offer something scarce or unique to every person Offer money
Offer to contact anyone else they know for them Demand they "send this to everyone in their inbox"
Ask if they might be interested in contributing a regular column/feature Offer this to people who are awful at writing
Name-drop people they know who have joined Throw numbers at them
Be as brief as possible Use anything from the marketing collateral
Have a list of bullet-points you need to cover Work from a template e-mail
Be informal Unless you're addressing formal groups
Try to strike an emotion or inflame an ambition Think everyone is motivated by the same things
Explain the dream/vision/purpose of the community Be dishonest. If the client wants something explain what
Leave recipients alone if they don't reply e-mail until you get a response
Understand outreach takes a lot of time. Full-time. Get the work experience kid to do it…in his own time
Remember to explain who you are, and what you do Pretend to be anything you're not.

Reaching out to people is a really delicate process. Don't try to bludgeon your way through it. It's not a process to be rushed, it's one to be enjoyed.

Plan who you're going to invite, what you're going to say and put in the time. The time you put in here will pay itself off many times over.

Making New Friends

October 6, 2008Comments Off on Making New Friends

Martin Reed wonders if you should invite your friends to join your online community?

Friends, he rightly reasons, have a vested interest in your success. They're more likely to help you out and get the community going.

I still wouldn't recommend it. Instead, find the first 10 to 20 people you would love to have in your community, and become friends with them.

By the time your community goes live, you should feel more than comfortable about inviting them.

Stages of Building An Online Community

October 6, 2008Comments Off on Stages of Building An Online Community

As I see it, there are 9 major stages of building an online community. They go a little like this…

  1. Defining the Cause. Why does this community exist? Does it fit into one of these categories? What advice can you give to the client about how to build a community that matters?
  2. Creating the Plan. What resources do you have? How can you stretch them to the max? What is the plan for the first 3 – 6 months? What's the architecture?
  3. Finding the first 10 people. Who are you going to reach in the beginning, and why? What do they want from a community? Can you get them talking to each other before it's built?
  4. Develop the interface. Function first, form second. Advise on what works.
  5. Outreach. How, when and why are you going to approach people?
  6. Internal Growth. What tactics will get people to tell their friends? How can you tighten the group?
  7. External Growth. Go for the big influencers, media, important types. Add that extra 0 to the community.
  8. Autonomy. How can you get this community to run itself? Can you make it self-recruiting? Self-growing? Self governing?
  9. Quit. Can you quit? Focus on something else? Move into a more overseeing role? Can you create a powerful niche group? Can you elevate key members into positions of real power and responsibility i.e. with a budget.

What do you think? Is there something missing? Have you noticed that developing the interface is just one stage? How does that affect your actions (or your budget)?

Hiren Patel has replied with his ideas.

A Good Reason To Hire A Community Builder

October 3, 2008Comments Off on A Good Reason To Hire A Community Builder

Only about 5% of Facebook groups are active. It’s because most aren’t built by people with any skill in building online communities. Facebook is a wasteland of inactive groups.

Here is the problem…

When people create a Facebook group, they send invitations to most of their friends to join. Being friends, many accept and the group grows at a speedy rate. Too speedy.

It grows too fast to develop any relationships. Too fast for the creator to identify the important contributors. Too fast to develop some culture, traditions and etiquette.

All in all, it grows too fast to do the foundation work a community builder does.

Once people join there is nothing to keep them coming back, they have nothing invested in the success of that community. They have no relationships to keep up, no time and ego invested and nothing to gain. At no point did these members want to be part of the group.

This is the equivalent of mass e-mailing your customers and inviting them to join your community. It’s the easy road, one that lets you skimp on hiring community builders and get a quick result. The result being a list of members you just e-mailed.

It Doesn’t Matter

October 3, 2008Comments Off on It Doesn’t Matter

No Online Community succeeds because it looks fantastic.

Why Not Have A Yearbook?

October 3, 2008Comments Off on Why Not Have A Yearbook?

Why not have a yearbook for your online community? Everyone that pays for a copy is included.

Everyone can submit pictures they want in it, and their best memories of being in that community. You could hand out awards too. It worked at high-school.

For that matter, why not start a company that lets people create their own year book? You can pick who you want in it. You could select which Facebook friends they want in it, add a bit of editorial and in-jokes and send to the printers.

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