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About Rich

  • Richard Millington is the founder of FeverBee, a community consultancy and Professional Community Management course. Richard is also the author of Buzzing Communities: How To Build Bigger, Better, And More Active Online Communities. Richard's clients have included Google, AutoDesk, United Nations, Novartis, Wikipedia, Oracle, The World Bank, Diabetes Hands Foundation, Fidelity Investments, and many more. Richard is also the the author of the Online Community Manifesto.

    e-mail: richard@feverbee.com
    T:+44 (0)7763 831931

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Comments

Dan Hinmon

Richard I am so much enjoying your blogs. Each one is a little nugget of insight, both interesting and practical. I am amazed at how you are able to come up with so much great material surrounding a topic as specific as online communities. Thanks for all your marvelous contributions!

Michael Howard

Great stuff, thanks Richard.

I think it's an important role of the moderation team to be proactive and set the daily agenda in a community - this can be by posting relevant news stories, starting discussions and linking in to relevant editorial.

Moderators are integral in setting the tone of a community - eg. by welcoming every member and encouraging the flow of information, help and advice across the membership.

Hazel

Moderating development... still sounds a little impersonal and structured to me - but I'd say this is a step in the right direction.

In my (albeit limited) experience, a focus on those bullet points, making the 'reactive moderation' a secondary focus, is much more beneficial to a community and it's members.

Ashley

Hi Richard,

This is a great example of what makes blogs unique: they are always in process. The discourse continues after the article is posted.

People seem to return to online communities whose authors respond to comments.

-Ashley

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