Interview for PR in Perspective

January 26, 2008Comments Off on Interview for PR in Perspective

After a fair bit of motherly nagging, i’ve finally got around to answering Sarah’s questions for her PR in Perspective column. You can read the full interview here. Here’s a snippet:

Do you think Web 2.0 is having an impact on how PR is practiced?
Yes, but not at the speed most bloggers are predicting. Most bloggers, by nature, are usually tech-savvy and work either in technology or communications sectors. Working in Cheltenham on my placement year I learnt that a lot of companies aren’t ready to begin blogging yet. If your audience never goes online and relies on newspapers, as some of our clients did at apt marketing & PR, a blog isn’t going to be much help.

In other industries however it became more of a case of how best PR and social media fit together. In Autumn 06 I worked briefly with a company called Wiggly Wigglers, founded by Heather Gorringe. Heather’s quite well known in social media circles these days through her brilliant Wiggly Wigglers podcast. Yet whilst Heather really was a perfect client for our new Social Media division, we struggled (as many PR agencies are doing) with figuring out quite how our PR expertise and her existing Social Media success fit together. We’ve learnt a lot since then, but it’s a struggle many agencies are still experiencing.

Agencies outside the biggest cities are still lagging behind with clients who wont grasp the social media concept for a few more years yet.

After reading that interview i’ve decided to delve a little more into my career choices for my next post.

Will niche social networks become ‘too’ niche and fragmented?

January 25, 2008Comments Off on Will niche social networks become ‘too’ niche and fragmented?

David Wilson at Social Media Optimization earlier this month wrote about the growth of niche social-networks.

The problem with Facebook, MySpace and most of the social networks we’ve heard about is they’re too big. There is no ‘social object’ which draws people to the site. These sites are popular for just that reason, because they are popular.

Much growth then is coming from niche social networking groups. Groups with a focus in mind. David cites Smooth.com for Wine Connoisseurs, Don’tStayIn.com for clubbers and Divorce360.com for divorcees. The benefits of these groups is getting the right people to speak to. He also noted in a seperate post the success of Redherring – a social network for restaurant ‘insiders’.

But how niche can niche social networks go? Will we start seeing groups divided by geographics? Here for example, a Cheltenham social networking group? The other issue, is that Facebook and other major social networks already offer users the ability to create their own interest sub-groups.

The challenge for marketers then is to pick a route and see it through. A Facebook group is the easier of the two to launch. Simply start the group, invite friends and watch the ripples spread. The problem is you have far less control of these Facebook groups. You can’t search for advertisers nor make any major changes to the format or structure of the group.

The alternative is to launch your own social network. The main challenge, of course, is creating one. Creating a new social social incurs the typical web-development barriers to entry. Once created, and presumably to a good standard – which itself is no easy feat – the challenge becomes getting people to register for it. This can prove especially tricky when many of the users you need are already registered on Facebook, MySpace, or LinkedIn.

The Niche social networking model also suffers from sustainability issues – there’s only so many niche social networks a single perhaps can actively follow. Facebook offers all the groups in one place, niche social networks (barring the rapid spread of the OpenSocial concept) do not. The flip side is that you might attract exactly the people you want, your most dedicated an evangelical followers.

Never attack the little guys

January 20, 2008Comments Off on Never attack the little guys

Lacoste_2 It’s difficult to understand why a fashion "giant" like Lacoste would sue a Cheltenham dentist surgery for using a similar Crocodile logo. What can they win? It’s a David -vs- Goliath story, and the public will always support David. As luck would have it, the Cheltenham dentist surgery won and are allowed to keep their Crocodile logo (the one they picked due to the association with teeth).

Ironically, had Lacoste won the publicity might well have been worse. Nobody likes giants rolling over the honest guys, and practicising dentists are favoured against corporate giants. It is difficult to see what Lacoste were hoping to gain. Even if Cheltenham residents did (and even this logic is a stretch) associate the logo of the dentist practice with Lacoste – would the latter have really suffered?

I believe that Lacoste’s lawyers aggrevated a situation and racked up an impressive number of billable hours over a trivial issue. Regardless of the result, they could never have won.

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